3 results for month: 06/2017


Talking about cognitive ability in 2017

2017 has already seen more science-lead findings on cognitive ability, and public discussion about the origins, and social and moral implications of ability, than we have had in some time, which should be good news for those seeking to understand and grow cognitive ability. This post brings together some of these events linking talk about differences in reasoning that are so near to our sense of autonomy and identity. Middlebury Twenty years ago, when  Dr Charles Murray co-authored a book with Harvard Psychologist Richard Herrnstein he opened up a conversation about the role of ability in the fabric of society, and in the process made him ...

Nature editorial: A positive inflection for research into ability

As GWAS results confirm links between cognitive ability and outcomes diverse as increased lifespan, better SES and education outcomes, and protection from mental illness, information on the genetics of cognitive ability itself has taken a quantum leap, Nature have posted an editorial framing these results against wide-spread misconceptions about  human intelligence. The editorial argues that these large molecular-based studies of human ability are themselves the best antidote to what the editor identifies as cognitive ability research's three worst enemies: First, biological determinism – the idea that genes work in isolation from enviro...

Global collaboration on GWAS yields 336 genetic effects linked to Cognitive Ability!

In the search to increase important economic and health-related life benefits linked to cognitive abilities, and knowing that many of these benefits are linked to the combined action of thousands of very, very small genetic effects, researchers have recognized that they need to pull together massive samples to make progress. That recognition has begun to bear fruit, with multiple new genes influencing cognitive ability being reported, for instance, from UK Biobank. Now, combining DNA and cognitive data from almost 80,000 individuals has yielded over 300 individual SNPs in 18 distinct genomic regions, 15 of which were previously unknown. ...