British Society for Individual Differences (BSPID) Jul 12, 2018 Edinburgh Programme

Venue: Room F21, 7 George Square, EH8 9JZ, Edinburgh. 9am: Welcome to BSPID 2018! (registration here) 9:10-10:15: Keynote: Dr. Kathryn Asbury, York University They called him Scar Boy: How Qualitative Methods can add value to Behavioural Genetics? 10:15-10:45: Morning Tea 10:45-noon: Talks Yue Li: Do 10-year old children stereotype males as more intellectually brilliant than females? (20") Huw Davies-Walters: Exploring the relationship between the 2-factor model of Perfectionism and Mental Toughness in Sport. Yusuke Takahashi: Direction of causation modeling on ...

Read More


Keynotes from Montreal now on YouTube

Recordings of Steve Pinker interview,  Camilla P. Benbow and David Lubinski Keynote, Jim Flynn Lifetime awardee, and Mat McGue Presidential Invited Address are now up on the society's YouTube Channel! Like what you see? Then you will love Edinburgh 2018. The meeting will be held in the historic Royal Society Edinburgh buildings, with a gala Banquet at the Royal College of Physicians. We've got an amazing set of speakers organized, and plenty of fresh ideas for making the conference an intellectually stimulating as well as socially-fun experience. Start planning ...

Read More


Talking about cognitive ability in 2017

2017 has already seen more science-lead findings on cognitive ability, and public discussion about the origins, and social and moral implications of ability, than we have had in some time, which should be good news for those seeking to understand and grow cognitive ability. This post brings together some of these events linking talk about differences in reasoning that are so near to our sense of autonomy and identity. Middlebury Twenty years ago, when  Dr Charles Murray co-authored a book with Harvard Psychologist Richard Herrnstein he opened up a conversation ...

Read More


Nature editorial: A positive inflection for research into ability

As GWAS results confirm links between cognitive ability and outcomes diverse as increased lifespan, better SES and education outcomes, and protection from mental illness, information on the genetics of cognitive ability itself has taken a quantum leap, Nature have posted an editorial framing these results against wide-spread misconceptions about  human intelligence. The editorial argues that these large molecular-based studies of human ability are themselves the best antidote to what the editor identifies as cognitive ability research's three worst enemies: First...

Read More


Global collaboration on GWAS yields 336 genetic effects linked to Cognitive Ability!

In the search to increase important economic and health-related life benefits linked to cognitive abilities, and knowing that many of these benefits are linked to the combined action of thousands of very, very small genetic effects, researchers have recognized that they need to pull together massive samples to make progress. That recognition has begun to bear fruit, with multiple new genes influencing cognitive ability being reported, for instance, from UK Biobank. Now, combining DNA and cognitive data from almost 80,000 individuals has yielded over 300 individ...

Read More