ISIR board member Jelte Wicherts awarded prestigious ERC Consolidator Grant to improve statistical rigour in psychology

ISIR congratulates our rising-star board-member Jelte Wicherts on being awarded a substantial and prestigious ERC Consolidator Grant to improve statistical rigour in psychology. Jelte is in the Department of Methodology and Statistics at Tilburg University in the Netherlands, where he heads a research group that focuses on biases in statistical decision making, errors in the reporting of statistical results, misconduct, data sharing, publication bias, and replicability. Congratulations Jelte!

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2016 ISIR Prize for Best Student Paper

Christin Lotz Biosketch: Christin obtained her diploma in psychology from the University of Trier, Germany. Currently, she is working on her PhD in educational science at the Saarland University, Germany and is mentored by Jörn Sparfeldt. Her research interests center how intelligence, complex problem solving, and educational attainment are connected. On the base of log-file analyses and SEMs, she investigates how intelligence performance scores as well as intelligence process measures contribute to the understanding of the close relation between intelligence and ...

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The Neuroscience of Intelligence! (new book from ISIR past president Rich Haier)

  Examination copies available now!  

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Great new post-doc with Texas Twin Project!

Texas Twin Project, Department of Psychology and Population Research Center A Postdoctoral Research position is available at the University of Texas at Austin under the supervision of Dr. Elliot Tucker-Drob and Dr. Paige Harden. The candidate will primarily work on the Texas Twin Project, which is currently funded by a 5-year R01 grant from NICHD. The Texas Twin Project is a multi-disciplinary study of an ethnically and socioeconomically diverse sample of child and adolescent twins, with a specific focus on understanding how biological stress influences the development of ...

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How to nurture a talented child

Very nice new article in Nature covering the work of ISIR leaders Camilla Benbow, David Lubinski, and others, and what inspired professor Julian Stanley to give brilliant but bored 12-year-old named Joseph Bates the SAT college-admissions exam, normally taken by university-bound 16- to 18-year-olds in the United States. The 12 year old scored at a level that would guarantee admission to Johns Hopkins, prompting 45 years (and counting) of the Study of Mathematically Precocious Youth (SMPY) and  transforming how gifted children are identified and supported by the ...

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